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American English VS British English Vocabulary and Worksheets

American English Vs British Vocabulary Worksheets Exercise Worksheet Words And Pdf Exercises With Answers  VS

Charmaine Brisay - September 17, 2021 - English Worksheet

What is meant is that there are 3 types of English variations, namely British (UK), American (US), and Australian, or the most widely used English variation.

Difference Between American English and British

Don’t just be amazed by the variety, but see each description below to find out the difference between the three.

1. How To Abbreviate

US English often abbreviates subjects with affixes, such as, “we’ll” from “we will”, “you’re” from “you are” (sometimes when speaking, this can sound like “your”), “math” from “ mathematics”, and others.

Australian English is also abbreviated a lot, however, Australian English has an even more unique accent. One common abbreviation in Australian English is “G’day” from “Good day”, which is usually used to greet people when they meet.

Even though UK English is known as English with a smooth speaking or accent, it does not mean that UK English does not have abbreviations.

The simplest example is the abbreviation of “mathematics” (mathematics) which is slightly different from US English, namely “maths” (just add “s” at the end).

2. How to Spell a Word (Spelling)

As mentioned earlier, English will look the same if we only look at it as a whole. However, when someone speaks, then from the way he spells the word or spelling, we can identify whether he is using US, UK, or Australian English.

The most prominent thing about the difference in speaking spelling between US, UK, and Australian English is the letter “a” with the letter “r”. In the next paragraph, we will look at how to spell these letters according to US, UK, or Australian English pronunciation.

In US English, the letter “a” is spelled as “e”. In some cases, it may sound like an “ei”, with a barely audible “i” and a distinctly audible “e”.

The letter “r” in certain words, especially when it is at the end of words such as “diver”, “bear”, and so on, tends to be not very clear when pronounced, so the sound becomes like “daive” (“e” is also not clear, but still clearer than “r”), “bie”, and so on.

UK English, as with Australian English, pronounces “a” the same as the letter, which is “a”. What distinguishes it from Australian English lies in the spelling of the letter “r”.

If there is no vowel before the “r”, then the letter “r” is not spelled. For example, “mushroom” has an h (not a vowel, but a consonant) before the “r”, then the “r” is not spelled.

UK English is also aware of the intrusive R phenomenon, namely the letter “r” which is intentionally added and spelled clearly between words ending in a vowel and the next word starting with a vowel, such as “China and …” where the word “China” ends in a vowel. the letters “a” (vowel) and “and” start with the letter “a” too, so “China” is spelled like “Chinar” or “Chiner”.

Australian English is the clearest English when it comes to both “a” and “r” pronunciation. Regarding the letter “a”, what makes Australian English different from the UK English closest to it is when it spells words that contain “day”, such as “G’day”, “How are you today?”, which sound like “ G’dai”, “How are you todai (sometimes people mistakenly hear it as “to die”)?”, and others.

Regarding the letter “r”, Australian English always spells it completely and clearly, especially when the “r” is in the middle of a word and there is a vowel before the “r”. For example, “bird” has an “i” before “r”, and “start” has an “a” before “r”, so the letter “r” is still spelled in these two examples.

3. Vocabulary

This third point is somewhat similar to spelling in that the words (perhaps) stand alone. However, what we need to remember is that vocabulary can also appear in written sentences.

So, the difference in vocabulary between US, UK, and Australian English, makes these three types of English even more interesting to learn in writing as well as verbally.

In US English, we are familiar with vocabulary such as “eggplant” for eggplant, “cookie” or “cracker” for small, one-time biscuits, and many others. In addition, the US English definition of the vocabulary “chips” is potato chips, while “fries” or “French fries” are french fries.

Meanwhile, UK UK tends to know eggplant as “aubergine”, “biscuit” as a biscuit that is small in size and can be eaten in one go, and many more.

Regarding the meaning of potato chips versus french fries, UK English understands it as a different vocabulary from US English, namely “chips” for french fries and “fries” for potato chips.

Apart from food, US English and UK English also differ in various other vocabularies. Some of the examples are when referring to an apartment, US English says “apartment”, while UK English calls it “flat”.

To refer to a postal code, US English calls it “zip code”, while UK UK calls it “postal code”. There is also a “ground floor” (UK English) with “first floor” (US English) to refer to the first floor in a building.

Australian English is the most different type of English among the three because it contains vocabulary that is not found in other parts of the world.

For example, “brekkie” for breakfast, “tucker” for general food, “ace” for something excellent, and “Aussie” for Australians.

4. Idioms Used

The difference between US, UK, and Australian English doesn’t just stop at abbreviations, spelling, or vocabulary. They also have a list of idioms with different meanings.

For example, the idiom “for the birds” which exists in the US and UK English, has a different meaning or understanding. US English understands it as something stupid, silly, or useless, while UK English understands it as something unimportant, and this is an informal (informal) idiom.

There are also several other examples of idioms that are typical of US English and not found in other versions of the English language. For example, “bend over backward” to express something that was done with maximum effort, or “smell a rat” to express something that is suspected of not working properly.

Some examples of UK English idioms are “popping out” to express a person who has left a place for a while in a painless way, “bee’s knees” to say something cool, or “raining cats and dogs” to express heavy rain.

The Australian English idiom is also unique compared to the US and UK English versions. We can see these examples of “beat around the bush” for something or someone whose answers are too roundabout, “it takes two to tango” to explain two or more sides to the other person to see, and “don’t give up your day jobs!” to say a person cannot do something he is currently doing.

From the four descriptions above, we see that each variation of English is different. UK English looks the most rigid and structured, US English looks more “rebellious” than UK English with its “letter-saving” and “word-saving” abbreviations and vocabulary, while Australian English has unique spelling, vocabulary, and idioms that cannot be understood. found, even in other countries.

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